Friday Photo: On the streets of Shinjuku

I’ve been going through some of my photo archives lately.  I realize that my photo management has started to get a bit unwieldy lately so I’m hoping to work on figuring out a better organization structure.  I was looking back on some memories from Japan in 2010 and I came across this photo.  It is probably one of my favorite photos from Japan over the dozen or so trips I have taken there over the last few years.  I was walking through Shinjuku with a friend I had met in Japan and we walked past this restaurant.  I quickly stopped, turned around, and framed a shot trying to be as inconspicuous as you possibly can with a DSLR.

This is one of the things I love about Tokyo.  That even in this huge city you can still find little establishments like this tucked into any available space they can find.  This place can seat maybe 12 people if you really tried.  Yet they can still manage to stay in business in one of the most expensive areas of one of the most expensive cities in the world.

Small Restaurant -- Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan

Check out Budget Sandbox and Delicious Baby for more travel photos.

Comments

    • AY says

      It is not easy to get in and out of there without everyone getting up around you. Thankfully taking a photo of it was easy since I was on the outside looking in.

    • AY says

      Are you planning a trip to Tokyo? I think I can recall, I know I’d be able to navigate back there if I was walking around. I believe it was out the exit near the huge Uniqlo and then a right and then in the direction of Kabukicho if I recall correctly.

  1. says

    Wow! Great photo. It is hard to get a shot in a confined space like that, but you did it, and captured the atmosphere as well–the best part in my opinion. As to organizing, I have things organized by place, but need to add tags so that I can find subject matter like flowers, interesting people, animals, etc.

    • AY says

      Thanks for the comment…you have a wonderful blog as well.
      Yeah I need to start tagging my photos too. I need to figure out a more automated way of doing things as well, maybe see if i can write some scripts perhaps to assist in some of the organization. Actually I was lucky with the photo since even though the restaurant is confined it opened out into the street so i was able to get the whole place in the shot.

    • AY says

      Yeah I would imagine that would play a part in that. I think its just so amazing though that any tiny little space you can fit in you find something there. I found some of the best places I’ve been to tucked under the train tracks that run through the city as well.

  2. says

    Cool shot! We stayed in Shinjuku too and passed by these small restaurants. We were never able to find seats because they were so tiny and always crowded. One of the things I love aboutTokyo are all the great food especially the Shinjuku area – such a lively atmosphere especially at night.

    • AY says

      Thanks for the comment! I did not get a chance to eat there, but I have eaten in places somewhat similar to that. It would be difficult to go unless with someone who speaks Japanese however. I found in these little establishments it is very very difficult without at least reading and conversational Japanese.

    • AY says

      Thanks for the comment Lisa! Actually Tokyo was nothing that I imagined it would be either. There are parts like the skyscraper district in Shinjuku, or parts of Shibuya, or Shiodome, or Odaiba that have the more futuristic feel I had imagined. But then there are places like this, or Yanaka, or parts of Asakusa and Ueno that are far away from that view too.

      My first trip or so to Tokyo I liked it but I wasn’t a huge fan of the place, maybe because I was overwhelmed and totally lost. But after a while I fell completely in love with the city. It is just overall so amazing.

  3. says

    Hi. I visited Tokyo for the first time last year, and my hotel was right in the heart of Shinjuku. It’s so alive and fast and exciting, it’s almost a city unto itself. I particularly loved the Golden Gai alleyways of bars and eateries where I think you took this cool pic. Agree with your statement: it’s an amazingly fast forward place that somehow holds on to its traditional roots.

    • AY says

      Thanks for the comment Stephen. I’m glad you liked your time in Tokyo as well! Actually this was not in Golden Gai, but I guess it wasn’t too far from that area either. It was just in a different part of Shinjuku, close to the train station. I really did love Golden Gai too, I went there on a trip back in December 2010. I did a little writeup about my time there if you are interested it reading it.

  4. says

    Nice one! I like how different this picture is from my usual travel pics. Also… let me know if you find a good way of organizing travel pics… I’m working on that too!

    • AY says

      I will definitely share my findings once I get a better handle on the organization. Glad you liked the photo too, thanks for the comment :)

  5. says

    I love the lighting and soft focus in this photo. Apart from the AC unit in the background it’s really hard to pick if this is a photo from today or 40 years ago. The old style restaurant, the men in suits … it could be from years ago.

    • AY says

      That’s what I love about Tokyo. How you can find a place that appears to have remained stuck in history juxtapositioned to a place you would imagine would exists in some crazy future. I am always impressed these places manage to stay in business, I can only wonder how many clients they manage to have nightly.

      • says

        I haven’t been to Tokyo but the one thing I’ve noticed all throughout Asia is usually these little hole in the wall places are always busier than anywhere else. The only way they can stay in business is if the food is always amazing, otherwise people just wouldn’t come. Although I think I’d go to that one in Tokyo just for the atmosphere even if the food was bad.

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